As APN’s become recognized or their accurate clinical decision making they become opinion leaders.  They are sought out by others and when the APN speaks, others listen (harmic 2014).  A common myth is that leaders are born and not made (harmic 2014).  According to Trent (2003) has asserted that this is not true and that individuals can learn to lead by understanding and using “power resources” as described by Roost (1993).  Power resources include many of the attributes such as education, experience, expert communication, networking, assertiveness, and collaboration and are clearly demonstrated in the studies of leadership.

It has been 6 years since I have completed my BSN degree and I thought I would never go back to school.  I was hoping this will give me the opportunity I have wanted as a Manager of a department or a Director.  I have been in roles as a supervisor or case manager in home care.  I have realized my career has not grown any further than a regular RN.  With the many job rejection, I have this have motivated me to take my career up to another level.  Throughout the years I have had some good leaders that I work with and some that didn’t have good leadership roles.   There have been times I wish I could have stepped in and given my opinion so that others could follow my lead and make changes to patient care. 

I am glad that I am able to advantage of this opportunity to further my nursing career to widen my job opportunity and be more autonomy.  I do see myself as an opinion leader in my position as home/hospice nurse because I am able to make a decision for families and patients.  I enjoy learning different things and using my knowledge to share with others.

References

Hamric, A. B., Hanson, C. M., Tracy, M. F., & O’Grady, E. (2014). Advanced practice nursing:  an integrative approach (5th ed.). St. Louis, MO: Elsevier/Saunders.